Exhibition

Faughart Lower

Faughart Lower lay on the main route from the Castletown ford at Dundalk to the Cooley Peninsular. This site was originally double-ditched and had its own cemetery of rich people buried in slab-lined graves. The site expanded over centuries and eventually had a large stone 'cashel' wall and two souterrains. The cemetery also expanded and by 10th/11th century AD it had taken over much of the site. In total, over 850 burials were recorded. More burials presumably occur under the nearby modern house.

Faughart Lower

Finds:
The finds from Faughart Lower show combs, lots of souterrain ware pottery, quern (grinding) stones, pins and brooches, glass beads and metal finds. One of the most interesting metal finds is an ingot, possibly of silver, that was found complete with a stone mould. Another important find was an iron plough coulter hidden in the souterrain.

Faughart Lower

The main souterrain had become unstable so the Faughart occupants deliberately took the top off and filled it with stones. Carefully placed in this filling was a large, granite quern stone. Grinding wheat with granite stones would be very hard on the teeth as tiny bits of granite would become mixed with the flour.

Faughart Lower

ASI: What is a 'Cashel'?
A Cashel is a ringfort with a stone-built wall. Many ringforts had stone facing to the earthen banks but only the richest could afford a whole enclosure built of stone. At Faughart Lower the wall facing the road was made entirely of stone. But where the wall was less visible, they simply used stone facing to the earth bank


VIEW/DOWNLOAD RELATED REPORTS